History Podcasts

SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, CSA - History

SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, CSA - History



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

GENERAL SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, CSA
VITAL STATISTICS
BORN: 1823 in Harty City, KY.
DIED: 1914 in Munfordville, KY.
CAMPAIGNS: Fort Donelson and Chickamauga.
HIGHEST RANK ACHIEVED: Brigadier General.
BIOGRAPHY
Simon Bolivar Buckner was born on April 1, 1823, in Hart County, Kentucky. After graduating from the US Military Academy in 1844, he served in the Mexican War. He left the army in 1855 to enter the business world. Although he did not own slaves, he felt that states had the right to determine whether they would allow slavery or not. He supported Kentucky's neutrality, refusing a commission in the Union Army. Escaping to the South to avoid arrest for being a traitor, Buckner was commissioned a brigadier general in the Confederate army on September 14, 1861. He occupied Bowling Green; and surrendered Fort Donelson, after his superiors fled, to his former West Point classmate Brig. Gen. U.S. Grant. After being exchanged, Buckner joined Gen. Braxton Bragg's 1862 invasion of Kentucky. He was placed in command of the Department of East Tennessee in 1863 transferred back to Bragg's army, and commanded troops at Chickamauga, but played only a minor role there. He became a leader in the campaign to get General Bragg removed. On September 20, 1864, Buckner was promoted to lieutenant general, and was moved to the Trans-Mississippi Department. There he served as chief of staff for Gen. Kirby Smith. In 1867, he was allowed to return home, where he worked successfully in business, wrote and became active in Confederate veterans' groups. In 1887, Buckner was elected governor of Kentucky as a Democrat, and served for four years. He ran for Vice President as a Gold Democrat in 1896, but lost the election. Buckner died at his home near Munfordville, Kentucky on January 8, 1914; the last survivor of the top three ranks in the Confederate military.

Simon Bolivar Buckner

Simon Bolivar Buckner (April 1, 1823 – January 8, 1914) fought in the United States Army in the Mexican–American War and in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He later served as the 30th Governor of Kentucky.

After graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point, Buckner became an instructor there. He took a hiatus from teaching to serve in the Mexican–American War, participating in many of the major battles of that conflict. He resigned from the army in 1855 to manage his father-in-law's real estate in Chicago, Illinois. He returned to his native state in 1857 and was appointed adjutant general by Governor Beriah Magoffin in 1861. In this position, he tried to enforce Kentucky's neutrality policy in the early days of the Civil War. When the state's neutrality was breached, Buckner accepted a commission in the Confederate Army after declining a similar commission to the Union Army. In 1862, he accepted Ulysses S. Grant's demand for an "unconditional surrender" at the Battle of Fort Donelson. He was the first Confederate general to surrender an army in the war. He participated in Braxton Bragg's failed invasion of Kentucky and near the end of the war became chief of staff to Edmund Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi Department.

In the years following the war, Buckner became active in politics. He was elected governor of Kentucky in 1887. It was his second campaign for that office. His term was plagued by violent feuds in the eastern part of the state, including the Hatfield-McCoy feud and the Rowan County War. His administration was rocked by scandal when state treasurer James "Honest Dick" Tate absconded with $250,000 from the state's treasury. As governor, Buckner became known for vetoing special interest legislation. In the 1888 legislative session alone, he utilized more vetoes than the previous ten governors combined. In 1895, he made an unsuccessful bid for a seat in the U.S. Senate. The following year, he joined the National Democratic Party, or "Gold Democrats", who favored a sound money policy over the Free Silver position of the mainline Democrats. He was the Gold Democrats' candidate for Vice President of the United States in the 1896 election, but polled just over one percent of the vote on a ticket with John M. Palmer. He never again sought public office and died of uremic poisoning on January 8, 1914.


Photo, Print, Drawing S.B. Buckner, CSA

The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Civil War Photographs (Anthony-Taylor-Rand-Ordway-Eaton Collection and Selected Civil War Photographs) - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. For information, see "Civil war photographs, 1861-1865," https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/120_cwar.html
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-cwpb-07434 (digital file from original neg.)
  • Call Number: LC-B813- 6582 B [P&P] LOT 4213 (corresponding photographic print)
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Photo, Print, Drawing S.B. Buckner, CSA

The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Civil War Photographs (Anthony-Taylor-Rand-Ordway-Eaton Collection and Selected Civil War Photographs) - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication. For information, see "Civil war photographs, 1861-1865," https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/120_cwar.html
  • Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-cwpb-07431 (digital file from original neg.)
  • Call Number: LC-B813- 6581 A [P&P] LOT 4213 (corresponding photographic print)
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Ближайшие родственники

About Lt.-Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, (CSA)

Simon Bolivar Buckner (April 1, 1823 – January 8, 1914) fought in the United States Army in the Mexican𠄺merican War and in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War. He later served as the 30th Governor of Kentucky.

After graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point, Buckner became an instructor there. He took a hiatus from teaching to serve in the Mexican𠄺merican War, participating in many of the major battles of that conflict. He resigned from the army in 1855 to manage his father-in-law's real estate in Chicago, Illinois. He returned to his native state in 1857 and was appointed adjutant general by Governor Beriah Magoffin in 1861. In this position, he tried to enforce Kentucky's neutrality policy in the early days of the Civil War. When the state's neutrality was breached, Buckner accepted a commission in the Confederate Army after declining a similar commission to the Union Army. In 1862, he accepted Ulysses S. Grant's demand for an "unconditional surrender" at the Battle of Fort Donelson. He was the first Confederate general to surrender an army in the war. He participated in Braxton Bragg's failed invasion of Kentucky and near the end of the war became chief of staff to Edmund Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi Department.

In the years following the war, Buckner became active in politics. He was elected governor of Kentucky in 1887. It was his second campaign for that office. His term was plagued by violent feuds in the eastern part of the state, including the Hatfield-McCoy feud and the Rowan County War. His administration was rocked by scandal when state treasurer James "Honest Dick" Tate absconded with $250,000 from the state's treasury. As governor, Buckner became known for vetoing special interest legislation. In the 1888 legislative session alone, he utilized more vetoes than the previous ten governors combined. In 1895, he made an unsuccessful bid for a seat in the U.S. Senate. The following year, he joined the National Democratic Party, or "Gold Democrats", who favored a sound money policy over the Free Silver position of the mainline Democrats. He was the Gold Democrats' candidate for Vice President of the United States in the 1896 election, but polled just over one percent of the vote on a ticket with John M. Palmer. He never again sought public office and died of uremic poisoning on January 8, 1914.

Simon B. Buckner, Sr., was born at Glen Lily, his family's estate near Munfordville, Kentucky. He was the third child and second son of Aylett Hartswell and Elizabeth Ann (Morehead) Buckner. Named after the "South American soldier and statesman, Simón Bolívar, then at the height of his power", the boy did not begin school until age nine, when he enrolled at a private school in Munfordville. His closest friend in Munfordville was Thomas J. Wood, who would become a Union Army general opposing Buckner at the Battle of Perryville and the Battle of Chickamauga during the Civil War. Buckner's father was an iron worker, but found that Hart County did not have sufficient timber to fire his iron furnace. Consequently, in 1838, he moved the family to southern Muhlenberg County where he organized an iron-making corporation.[6] Buckner attended school in Greenville, and later at Christian County Seminary in Hopkinsville.

On July 1, 1840, Buckner enrolled at the United States Military Academy.[8] In 1844 he graduated eleventh in his class of 25 and was commissioned a brevet second lieutenant in the 2nd U.S. Infantry Regiment. He was assigned to garrison duty at Sackett's Harbor on Lake Ontario until August 28, 1845, when he returned to the Academy to serve as an assistant professor of geography, history, and ethics.

Service in the Mexican𠄺merican War

In May 1846, Buckner resigned his teaching position to fight in the Mexican𠄺merican War, enlisting with the 6th U.S. Infantry Regiment. His early duties included recruiting soldiers and bringing them to the Texas border. In November 1846, he was ordered to join his company in the field he met them en route between Monclova and Parras. The company joined John E. Wool at Saltillo. In January 1847, Buckner was ordered to Vera Cruz with William J. Worth's division. While Maj. Gen. Winfield Scott besieged Vera Cruz, Buckner's unit engaged a few thousand Mexican cavalry at a nearby town called Amazoque.

On August 8, 1847, Buckner was appointed quartermaster of the 6th Infantry. Shortly thereafter, he participated in battles at San Antonio and Churubusco, being slightly wounded in the latter battle. He was appointed a brevet first lieutenant for gallantry at Churubusco and Contreras, but declined the honor in part because reports of his participation at Contreras were in error—he had been fighting in San Antonio at the time. Later, he was offered and accepted the same rank solely based on his conduct at Churubusco.

Buckner was again cited for gallant conduct at the Battle of Molino del Rey, and was appointed a brevet captain. He participated in the Battle of Chapultepec, the Battle of Belen Gate, and the storming of Mexico City. At the conclusion of the war, American soldiers served as an army of occupation for a time, leaving soldiers time for leisure activities. Buckner joined the Aztec Club, and in April 1848 was a part of the successful expedition of Popocatépetl, a volcano southeast of Mexico City. Buckner was afforded the honor of lowering the American flag over Mexico City for the last time during the occupation.

After the war, Buckner accepted an invitation to return to West Point to teach infantry tactics. Just over a year later, he resigned the post in protest over the academy's compulsory chapel attendance policy. Following his resignation, he was assigned to a recruiting post at Fort Columbus.

Buckner married Mary Jane Kingsbury on May 2, 1850, at her aunt's home in Old Lyme, Connecticut. Shortly after their wedding, he was assigned to Fort Snelling and later to Fort Atkinson on the Arkansas River in present-day Kansas. On December 31, 1851, he was promoted to first lieutenant, and on November 3, 1852, he was elevated to captain of the commissary department of the 6th U.S. Infantry in New York City. Previously, he had attained only a brevet to these ranks. Buckner gained such a reputation for fair dealings with the Indians, that the Oglala Lakota tribe called him Young Chief, and their leader, Yellow Bear, refused to treat with anyone but Buckner.

Before leaving the Army, Buckner helped an old friend from West Point and the Mexican𠄺merican War, Captain Ulysses S. Grant, by covering his expenses at a New York hotel until money arrived from Ohio to pay for his passage home. On March 26, 1855, Buckner resigned from the Army to work with his father-in-law, who had extensive real estate holdings in Chicago, Illinois. When his father-in-law died in 1856, Buckner inherited his property and moved to Chicago to manage it.

Still interested in military affairs, Buckner joined the Illinois State Militia of Cook County as a major. On April 3, 1857, he was appointed adjutant general of Illinois by Governor William Henry Bissell. He resigned the post in October of the same year. Following the Mountain Meadows massacre, a regiment of Illinois volunteers organized for potential service in a campaign against the Mormons. Buckner was offered command of the unit and a promotion to the rank of colonel. He accepted the position, but predicted that the unit would not see action. His prediction proved correct, as negotiations between the federal government and Mormon leaders eased tensions between the two.

In late 1857, Buckner and his family returned to his native state and settled in Louisville. Buckner's daughter, Lily, was born there on March 7, 1858. Later that year, a Louisville militia known as the Citizens' Guard was formed, and Buckner was made its captain. He served in this capacity until 1860, when the Guard was incorporated into the Kentucky State Guard's Second Regiment. He was appointed inspector general of Kentucky in 1860.

In 1861 Kentucky governor Beriah Magoffin appointed Buckner adjutant general, promoted him to major general, and charged him with revising the state's militia laws. The state was torn between Union and Confederacy, with the legislature supporting the former and the governor the latter. This led the state to declare itself officially neutral. Buckner assembled 61 companies to defend Kentucky's neutrality.

The state board that controlled the militia considered it to be pro-secessionist and ordered it to store its arms. On July 20, 1861, Buckner resigned from the state militia, declaring that he could no longer perform his duties due to the board's actions. That August he was twice offered a commission as a brigadier general in the Union Army—the first from general in chief Winfield Scott, and the second from Secretary of War Simon Cameron following the personal order of President Abraham Lincoln𠅋ut he declined. After Confederate Maj. Gen. Leonidas Polk occupied Columbus, Kentucky, violating the state's neutrality, Buckner accepted a commission as a brigadier general in the Confederate States Army on September 14, 1861, and was followed by many of the men he formerly commanded in the state militia. When his Confederate commission was approved, Union officials in Louisville indicted him for treason and seized his property. (Concerned that a similar action might be taken against his wife's property in Chicago, he had previously deeded it to his brother-in-law.) He became a division commander in the Army of Central Kentucky under Brig. Gen. William J. Hardee and was stationed in Bowling Green, Kentucky.

After Union Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant captured Fort Henry on the Tennessee River in February 1862, he turned his sights on nearby Fort Donelson on the Cumberland. Western Theater commander Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston sent Buckner to be one of four brigadier generals defending the fort. In overall command was the influential politician and military novice John B. Floyd Buckner's peers were Gideon J. Pillow and Bushrod Johnson.

Buckner's division defended the right flank of the Confederate line of entrenchments that surrounded the fort and the small town of Dover, Tennessee. On February 14, the Confederate generals decided they could not hold the fort and planned a breakout, hoping to join with Johnston's army, now in Nashville. At dawn the following morning, Pillow launched a strong assault against the right flank of Grant's army, pushing it back 1 to 2 miles (2 to 3 km). Buckner, not confident of his army's chances and not on good terms with Pillow, held back his supporting attack for over two hours, which gave Grant's men time to bring up reinforcements and reform their line. Buckner's delay did not prevent the Confederate attack from opening a corridor for an escape from the besieged fort. However, Floyd and Pillow combined to undo the day's work by ordering the troops back to their trench positions.

Late that night the generals held a council of war in which Floyd and Pillow expressed satisfaction with the events of the day, but Buckner convinced them that they had little realistic chance to hold the fort or escape from Grant's army, which was receiving steady reinforcements. His defeatism carried the meeting. General Floyd, concerned he would be tried for treason if captured by the North, sought Buckner's assurance that he would be given time to escape with some of his Virginia regiments before the army surrendered. Buckner agreed and Floyd offered to turn over command to his subordinate, Pillow. Pillow immediately declined and passed command to Buckner, who agreed to stay behind and surrender. Pillow and Floyd were able to escape, as did cavalry commander Col. Nathan Bedford Forrest.

That morning, Buckner sent a messenger to the Union Army requesting an armistice and a meeting of commissioners to work out surrender terms. He may have been hoping Grant would offer generous terms, remembering the assistance he gave Grant when he was destitute, but Grant had no sympathy for his old friend and his reply included the famous quotation, "No terms except unconditional and immediate surrender can be accepted. I propose to move immediately upon your works." To this, Buckner responded:

SIR:—The distribution of the forces under my command, incident to an unexpected change of commanders, and the overwhelming force under your command, compel me, notwithstanding the brilliant success of the Confederate arms yesterday, to accept the ungenerous and unchivalrous terms which you propose.

Grant was courteous to Buckner following the surrender and offered to loan him money to see him through his impending imprisonment, but Buckner declined. The surrender was a humiliation for Buckner personally, but also a strategic defeat for the Confederacy, which lost more than 12,000 men and much equipment, as well as control of the Cumberland River, which led to the evacuation of Nashville.[35]

While Buckner was a Union prisoner of war at Fort Warren in Boston, Kentucky Senator Garrett Davis unsuccessfully sought to have him tried for treason. On August 15, 1862, after five months of writing poetry in solitary confinement, Buckner was exchanged for Union Brig. Gen. George A. McCall.[36] The following day he was promoted to major general and ordered to Chattanooga, Tennessee, to join Gen. Braxton Bragg's Army of Mississippi.

Days after Buckner joined Bragg, both Bragg and Maj. Gen. Edmund Kirby Smith began an invasion of Kentucky. As Bragg pushed north, his first encounter was in Buckner's home town of Munfordville. The small town was important for Union forces to maintain communication with Louisville if they decided to press southward to Bowling Green and Nashville. A small force under the command of Col. John T. Wilder guarded the town. Though vastly outnumbered, Wilder refused requests to surrender on September 12 and September 14. By September 17, however, Wilder recognized his difficult position and asked Bragg for proof of the superior numbers he claimed. In an unusual move, Wilder agreed to be blindfolded and brought to Buckner. When he arrived, he told Buckner that he (Wilder) was not a military man and had come to ask him what he should do. Flattered, Buckner showed Wilder the strength and position of the Confederate forces, which outnumbered Wilder's men almost 5-to-1. Seeing the hopeless situation he was in, Wilder informed Buckner that he wanted to surrender. Any other course, he later explained, would be "no less than willful murder."

Bragg's men continued northward to Bardstown where they rested and sought supplies and recruits. Meanwhile, Maj. Gen. Don Carlos Buell's Army of the Ohio, the main Union force in the state, was pressing toward Louisville. Bragg left his army and met Kirby Smith in Frankfort, where he was able to attend the inauguration of Confederate Governor Richard Hawes on October 4. Buckner, although protesting this distraction from the military mission, attended as well and gave stirring speeches to the local crowds about the Confederacy's commitment to the state of Kentucky. The inauguration ceremony was disrupted by the sound of cannon fire from an approaching Union division and the inaugural ball scheduled for that evening was canceled.

Based on intelligence acquired by a spy in Buell's army, Buckner advised Bragg that Buell was still ten miles from Louisville in the town of Mackville. He urged Bragg to engage Buell there before he reached Louisville, but Bragg declined. Buckner then asked Leonidas Polk to request that Bragg concentrate his forces and attack the Union army at Perryville, but again, Bragg refused. Finally, on October 8, 1862, Bragg's army—not yet concentrated with Kirby Smith's𠅎ngaged Maj. Gen. Alexander McCook's corps of Buell's army and began the Battle of Perryville. Buckner's division fought under General Hardee during this battle, achieving a significant breakthrough in the Confederate center, and reports from Hardee, Polk, and Bragg all praised Buckner's efforts. His gallantry was for naught, however, as Perryville ended in a tactical draw that was costly for both sides, causing Bragg to withdraw and abandon his invasion of Kentucky. Buckner joined many of his fellow generals in publicly denouncing Bragg's performance during the campaign.

Following the Battle of Perryville, Buckner was reassigned to command the District of the Gulf, fortifying the defenses of Mobile, Alabama.[9] He remained there until late April 1863, when he was ordered to take command of the Army of East Tennessee. He arrived in Knoxville on May 11, 1863, and assumed command the following day. Shortly thereafter, his department was converted into a district of the Department of Tennessee under Gen. Bragg and was designated the Third Corps of the Army of Tennessee.

In late August, Union Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside approached Buckner's position at Knoxville. Buckner called for reinforcements from Bragg at Chattanooga, but Bragg was being threatened by forces under Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans and could not spare any of his men. Bragg ordered Buckner to fall back to the Hiwassee River. From there, Buckner's unit traveled to Bragg's supply base at Ringgold, Georgia, then on to Lafayette and Chickamauga. Bragg was also forced from Chattanooga and joined Buckner at Chickamauga. On September 19 and 20, the Confederate forces attacked and emerged victorious at the Battle of Chickamauga. Buckner's Corps fought on the Confederate left both days, the second under the "wing" command of Lt. Gen. James Longstreet, participating in the great breakthrough of the Union line.

After Chickamauga, Rosecrans and his Army of the Cumberland retreated to fortified Chattanooga. Bragg held an ineffective siege against Chattanooga, but refused to take any further action as the Union forces there were reinforced by Ulysses S. Grant and reopened a tenuous supply line.[46] Many of Bragg's subordinates, including Buckner, advocated that Bragg be relieved of command. Thomas L. Connelly, historian of the Army of Tennessee, believes that Buckner was the author of the anti-Bragg letter sent by the generals to President Jefferson Davis. Bragg retaliated by reducing Buckner to division command and abolishing the Department of East Tennessee.

Buckner was given a medical leave of absence following Chickamauga, returning to Virginia, where he engaged in routine work while recovering his strength. His division was sent without him to support Longstreet in the Knoxville Campaign, while the remainder of Bragg's army was defeated in the Chattanooga Campaign. Buckner served on the court martial of Maj. Gen. Lafayette McLaws after that subordinate of Longstreet's was charged with poor performance at Knoxville. Buckner was briefly given command of Maj. Gen. John Bell Hood's division in February 1864, and on March 8, he was given command of the reestablished Department of East Tennessee. The department was a shell of its former self—less than one-third its original size, badly equipped, and in no position to mount an offensive. Buckner was virtually useless to the Confederacy here, and on April 28, he was ordered to join Edmund Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi Department of the Confederacy.

Buckner had difficulty traveling to the West, and it was early summer before he arrived. He assumed command of the District of West Louisiana on August 4. Shortly after Buckner arrived at Smith's headquarters in Shreveport, Louisiana, Smith began requesting a promotion for him. The promotion to lieutenant general came on September 20. Smith placed Buckner in charge of the critical but difficult task of selling the department's cotton through enemy lines.

As news of Gen. Robert E. Lee's surrender on April 9, 1865, reached the department, soldiers deserted the Confederacy in droves. On April 19, Smith consolidated the District of Arkansas with the District of West Louisiana the combined district was put under Buckner's command. On May 9, Smith made Buckner his chief of staff. Rumors began to swirl in both Union and Confederate camps that Smith and Buckner would not surrender, but would fall back to Mexico with soldiers who remained loyal to the Confederacy. Though Smith did cross the Rio Grande, he learned on his arrival that Buckner had traveled to New Orleans on May 26 and arranged terms of surrender. Smith had instead instructed Buckner to move all the troops to Houston, Texas.

At Fort Donelson, Tennessee, Buckner had become the first Confederate general of the war to surrender an army at New Orleans, he became one of the last. The surrender became official when Smith endorsed it on June 2, (Only Brigadier General Stand Watie held out longer, he surrendered the last Confederate land forces on June 23, 1865).

Conditions set forth in Buckner's surrender were the following:

(1) "All acts of hostility on the part of both armies are to cease from this date." (2) The officers and men are to be "paroled until duly exchanged." (3) All Confederate property was to be turned over to the Union. (4) All officers and men could return home. (5) "The surrender of property will not include the side arms or private horses or baggage of officers" and enlsited men. (6) "All 'self-disposed persons' who return to 'peaceful pursuits' are assured that may resume their usual avocations . . . "."

The terms of Buckner's parole in Shreveport, Louisiana, on June 9, 1865, prevented his return to Kentucky for three years. He remained in New Orleans, worked on the staff of the Daily Crescent newspaper, engaged in a business venture, and served of the board of directors of a fire insurance company, of which he became president in 1867. His wife and daughter joined him in the winter months of 1866 and 1867, but he sent them back to Kentucky in the summers because of the frequent outbreaks of cholera and yellow fever.

Buckner returned to Kentucky when he was eligible in 1868 and became editor of the Louisville Courier. Like most former Confederate officers, he petitioned the United States Congress for the restoration of his civil rights as stipulated by the 14th Amendment. He recovered most of his property through lawsuits and regained much of his wealth through shrewd business deals.

On January 5, 1874, after five years of suffering with tuberculosis, Buckner's wife died. Now a widower, Buckner continued to live in Louisville until 1877 when he and his daughter Lily returned to the family estate in Munfordville. His sister, a recent widow, also returned to the estate in 1877. For six years, these three inhabited and repaired the house and grounds of Glen Lily, which had been neglected during the war and its aftermath. On June 14, 1883, Lily Buckner married Morris B. Belknap of Louisville, and the couple made their residence in Louisville. On October 10 of the same year, Buckner's sister died, and he was left alone.

Buckner had a keen interest in politics and friends had been urging him to run for governor since 1867, even while terms of his surrender confined him to Louisiana. Unwilling to violate these terms, he instructed a friend to withdraw his name from consideration if it was presented. In 1868, he was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention that nominated Horatio Seymour for president. Though Buckner had favored George H. Pendleton, he loyally supported the party's nominee throughout the campaign.

In 1883, Buckner was a candidate for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination. Other prominent candidates included Congressman Thomas Laurens Jones, former congressman J. Proctor Knott, and Louisville mayor Charles Donald Jacob.[65] Buckner consistently ran third in the first six ballots, but withdrew his name from consideration before the seventh ballot. The delegation from Owsley County switched their support to Knott, starting a wave of defections that resulted in Jones' withdrawal and Knott's unanimous nomination. Knott went on to win the general election and appointed Buckner to the board of trustees for the Kentucky Agricultural and Mechanical College (later the University of Kentucky) in 1884. At that year's state Democratic convention, he served on the committee on credentials.

On June 10, 1885, Buckner married Delia Claiborne of Richmond, Kentucky.Buckner was 62 Claiborne was 28. Their son, Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr., was born on July 18, 1886.

Delegates to the 1887 state Democratic convention nominated Buckner unanimously for the office of governor. A week later, the Republicans chose William O. Bradley as their candidate. The Prohibition Party and the Union Labor Party also nominated candidates for governor. The official results of the election gave Buckner at plurality of 16,797 over Bradley.

Buckner proposed a number of progressive ideas, most of which were rejected by the legislature. Among his successful proposals were the creation of a state board of tax equalization, creation of a parole system for convicts, and codification of school laws. His failed proposals included creation of a department of justice, greater local support for education and better protection for forests.

Much of Buckner's time was spent trying to curb violence in the eastern part of the state. Shortly after his inauguration, the Rowan County War escalated to vigilantism, when residents of the county organized a posse and killed several of the leaders of the feud. Though this essentially ended the feud, the violence had been so bad that Buckner's adjutant general recommended that the Kentucky General Assembly dissolve Rowan County, though this suggestion was not acted upon. In 1888, a posse from Kentucky entered West Virginia and killed a leader of the Hatfield clan in the Hatfield-McCoy feud. This caused a political conflict between Buckner and Governor Emanuel Willis Wilson of West Virginia, who complained that the raid was illegal. The matter was adjudicated in federal court, and Buckner was cleared of any connection to the raid. Later in Buckner's term, feuds broke out in Harlan, Letcher, Perry, Knott, and Breathitt counties.

A major financial scandal erupted in 1888 when Buckner ordered a routine audit of the state's finances which had been neglected for years. The audit showed that the state's longtime treasurer, James "Honest Dick" Tate, had been mismanaging and embezzling the state's money since 1872. Faced with the prospect that his malfeasance would be discovered, Tate absconded with nearly $250,000 of state funds. He was never found. The General Assembly immediately began impeachment hearings against Tate, convicted him in absentia, and removed him from office. State auditor Fayette Hewitt was censured for neglecting the duty of his office, but was not implicated in Tate's theft or disappearance.

During the 1888 session, the General Assembly passed 1,571 bills, exceeding the total passed by any other session in the state's history. Only about 150 of these bills were of a general nature the rest were special interest bills passed for the private gain of legislators and those in their constituencies. Buckner vetoed 60 of these special interest bills, more than had been vetoed by the previous ten governors combined. Only one of these vetoes was overridden by the legislature. Ignoring Buckner's clear intent to veto special interest bills, the 1890 legislature passed 300 more special interest bills than had its predecessor. Buckner vetoed 50 of these. His reputation for rejecting special interest bills led the Kelley Axe Factory, the largest axe factory in the country at the time, to present him with a ceremonial "Veto Hatchet".

When a tax cut passed over Buckner's veto in 1890 drained the state treasury, the governor loaned the state enough money to remain solvent until tax revenue came in. Later that year, he was chosen as a delegate to the state's constitutional convention. In this capacity, he unsuccessfully sought to extend the governor's appointment powers and levy taxes on churches, clubs, and schools that made a profit.

After his term as governor, Buckner returned to Glen Lily. In 1895, he was one of four candidates nominated for a seat in the U.S. Senate —the others being the incumbent, J. C. S. Blackburn outgoing governor John Y. Brown and congressman James B. McCreary. The Democratic party split over the issue of bimetalism. Buckner advocated for a gold standard, but the majority of Kentuckians advocated "Free Silver". Seeing that he would not be able to win the seat in light of this opposition, he withdrew from the race in July 1895.[80] In spite of his withdrawal, he still received 9 of the 134 votes cast in the General Assembly.[81]

At the 1896 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, the Democrats nominated William Jennings Bryan for president and adopted a platform calling for the free coinage of silver. Sound money Democrats opposed Bryan and the free silver platform. They formed a new party—the National Democratic Party, or Gold Democrats—which Buckner joined. At the new party's state convention in Louisville, Buckner's name was proposed as a candidate for vice president. He was given the nomination without opposition at the party's national convention in Indianapolis. Former Union general John Palmer was chosen as the party's nominee for president.

Palmer and Buckner both had developed reputations as independent executives while serving as governors of their respective states. Because they had served on opposite sides during the Civil War, their presence on the same ticket emphasized national unity. The ticket was endorsed by several major newspapers including the Chicago Chronicle, Louisville Courier-Journal, Detroit Free Press, Richmond Times, and New Orleans Picayune. Despite these advantages, the ticket was hurt by the candidates' ages, Palmer being 79 and Buckner 73. Further, some supporters feared that voting for the National Democrat ticket would be a wasted vote and might even throw the election to Bryan. Ultimately, Palmer and Buckner received just over one percent of the vote in the election.

Following this defeat, Buckner retired to Glen Lily but remained active in politics. Though he always claimed membership in the Democratic party, he opposed the machine politics of William Goebel, his party's gubernatorial nominee in 1899. In 1903, he supported his son-in-law, Morris Belknap, for governor against Goebel's lieutenant governor, J. C. W. Beckham. When the Democrats again nominated William Jennings Bryan in the 1908 presidential election, Buckner openly supported Bryan's opponent, Republican William Howard Taft.

At 80 years of age, Buckner memorized five of Shakespeare's plays because cataracts threatened to blind him, but an operation saved his sight. On a visit to the White House in 1904, Buckner asked President Theodore Roosevelt to appoint his only son as a cadet at West Point, and Roosevelt quickly agreed. His son would later serve in the U.S. Army and be killed at the Battle of Okinawa, making him the highest-ranking American to have been killed by enemy fire during World War II.

Following the deaths of Stephen D. Lee and Alexander P. Stewart in 1908, Buckner became the last surviving Confederate soldier with the rank of lieutenant general. The following year, he visited his son, who was stationed in Texas, and toured old Mexican𠄺merican War battlefields where he had served. In 1912, his health began to fail. He died on January 8, 1914, after a week-long bout with uremic poisoning. He was buried in Frankfort Cemetery in Frankfort, Kentucky.


SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, CSA - History

I get a considerable amount of email and telephone calls that begin "Are you related to . " The following family "vine" traces my particular branch of the Buckner family from the seventeenth-century boat ride to late twentieth-century.

I have additional information that I will add at such time as my notes and my computer terminal get into the same city.

I have deliberately omitted certain information. First, I do not identify those members of the current generation who have yet to reach the age of majority. Second, I will add the current whereabouts of the current generation as I get permission to do so. Be forewarned, however, that this ranks relatively low on my list of personal priorities.

Thanks for looking here before placing the call.

Sources and Acknowledgements

The John-Richard-Philip-Philip-Aylett-Simon-Simon line is recounted in Stickles' biography of Simon Bolivar Buckner. In that book, SBB, Jr. identifies his uncles, his aunt and his cousins. All but one of the Buckners since SBB, Jr. are known personally to me.

All other information comes from Mrs. Dixie Lee Bryant Brown's D.A.R. application. (She traces her ancestery through another of Philip B. Jr/Elizabeth Watson's children.)

Peter R. Buckner checks in periodically to correct details.

Reading the table

Each row in the following table represents a generation. The capitalized name in each line is the father of the children listed in the following row of the table. The names within the cell are, of course, siblings.

The details, unless noted, pertain to the individual whose name is capitalized.

Richard came to America with JOHN

Dixie Lee Bryant Brown identifies Henry Watson as a sibling.
HWB m. Mary Bomar.

Tom Wilbur of Okemos, MI reports that HWB and Mary Bomar produced another line of Simon Bolivar Buckners

Turner Hartswell
SIMON BOLIVAR
Mary Elizabeth
Six other children did not live to maturity

SIMON BOLIVAR
Lt. Gen., CSA
b.1823 April 1

There is a short biography at: http://www.civilwarhome.com/bucknerbio.htm
Although I have a various photographs of General Buckner at various stages of his life, this one is from the Harpers Weekly, August 15, 1896.

Mary Elizabeth
b. 1831
m. John A Tooke (of Georgia, d. 1858 in Arkansas)
d. 1883

two sons:
Aylett Buckner Tooke (moved to Colorado)
Edwin Arthur Tooke

WCB
m. Virginia Lester
(living in Kansas City, MO)

PRB
b. 1959 March 29, Tulsa, Oklahoma
m. 1987 June 20, Candy Eva Shue
(living in San Francisco, California)

RLB
b. 1961 February 14, Kansas City, Missouri
m. Anna-Elena Roberts
(living in Kansas City, Missouri)


Buckner, Simon Bolivar (1823-1914) Papers, 1825-1994

Rights: For information regarding literary and copyright interest for these papers, contact the Curator of Collections.

Size of Collection: 4.33 cubic feet

Location Number: Mss. A B925b

Scope and Content Note

The Simon B. Buckner papers reflect the lives and pursuits of three generations of the Buckner family of Hart County, Kentucky. The papers of Simon Buckner’s parents, Aylett Hartswell Buckner (1798-1851) and Elizabeth Ann Morehead (1801-1861), largely pertain to business, family matters and the people they held in bondage. Prior to the family’s removal to Arkansas in 1843, Aylett was co-owner of an iron ore furnace in Muhlenberg County which employed both free and slave labor. Also referenced in this portion of the collection are Simon Buckner’s siblings, Turner Hartswell Buckner (1820-1854), a “forty-niner,” who died on his second trek to California and Mary Elizabeth Buckner (1831-1883) who married John Tooke (1823-1858).

The heart of the collection, however, documents the life and career of Simon Bolivar Buckner (1823-1914) who served as an officer in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War, a lieutenant general in the Confederate Army during the Civil War and as governor of Kentucky (1887-1891). Numerous letters to and from Buckner, who was known to his family as Bolivar, shed light on his West Point days and military service from 1844 to 1855. Several letters and an unfinished memoir describe his Mexican War experiences as a member of Gen. Winfield Scott’s command during the advance on Mexico City. Other letters describe his duties following the Mexican War at military posts in the territories of Minnesota and Kansas as well as New York City. Buckner’s Civil War papers contain several documents related to the major campaigns in the western theater, including Fort Donelson, Perryville, Stones River and Chickamauga. Of particular interest is a notebook in which he recorded his after-action recollections of the opening phase of the battle of Chickamauga which includes a hand drawn map. Most of his war papers, however, pertain to Buckner’s operations against Union Col. William P. Sanders 1863 cavalry raid through East Tennessee and the closing days of the conflict in the Trans-Mississippi Department. In fact, Buckner was a central figure in arranging the surrender terms for Confederate forces serving west of the Mississippi.

Buckner’s post-war papers contain several letters from prominent ex-Confederates who were adjusting to life following the collapse of the Confederacy. His correspondence also reflects his activities in New Orleans prior to his return to Kentucky in 1868. A sizeable portion of his papers from the 1870s pertains to his family, his Kentucky estate at Glen Lily and both business and legal activities. In 1883 Buckner made an unsuccessful bid to win the Democratic nomination for governor of Kentucky. Many of his papers reflect his political career, which included serving as governor (1887-1891) and as a vice presidential candidate for the Gold Democratic party in the election of 1896. Buckner’s papers prior to his death in 1914 continue to reflect an interest in politics as well as his activities with both Mexican War and Confederate veterans’ organizations.

There are a few letters relating to the courtship, and later marital problems, of Buckner and his first wife, Mary Jane Kingsbury. The collection also reflects the life of Buckner’s first wife and the Kingsbury family. Her father, Julius Kingsbury, a native of Connecticut, married Jane Creed Stebbins while he was a young army officer stationed in the Michigan Territory. The Kingsbury papers pertain to Julius Kingsbury’s military service, including the Mexican War, his business and real estate ventures in Chicago, Illinois and the settlement of his estate. Also included are letters that shed light on the education and personal life of Mary and her siblings, including Col. Henry Kingsbury who was killed fighting for the Union cause at the battle of Antietam in 1862.

The collection also sheds light on the life and family of Buckner’s second wife, Delia Hayes Claiborne. Included are numerous courtship letters between the 62-year-old General and the 28-year-old Virginia belle. Her circle of friends included Gen. George Washington Custis Lee and Mildred Lee, the children of Gen. Robert E. Lee. In addition to participating in Confederate veteran programs she was also active in the Colonial Dames and appears to have supported the Women’s Rights movement in the early 20th Century.

Also included are several documents that reflect the life and career of Gen. Simon B. Buckner, Jr. and his wife, Adele Blanc Buckner. He graduated from West Point in 1908 and served stateside during World War I. He subsequently graduated from the Command and General Staff School and the War College before joining the faculty of West Point in the 1930’s. He commanded American forces in Alaska following the outbreak of World War II and was killed in action at the battle of Okinawa in 1945. He was the highest-ranking American officer to be killed by enemy fire during World War II.

The collection is supplemented by bound materials, newspapers and scrapbooks.

Biographical Note

A native of Hart County, Kentucky, Simon Bolivar Buckner graduated from West Point in 1844 and served as an officer in the 6th U.S. Infantry during the Mexican War. After the conflict he was stationed at posts in the territories of Minnesota and Kansas territories. Promoted to captain, he resigned his commission in 1855 and assisted his father-in-law with his business interests in Chicago. Buckner returned to Kentucky in 1858 and in 1860 was appointed General of the Kentucky State Guard.

At the outbreak of the Civil War he offered his services to the Confederacy and was promoted to the rank of brigadier general in 1861. He served throughout the conflict in the Western Theater and was taken prisoner following the surrender of Fort Donelson, Tennessee on February 16, 1862. Exchanged later that year, he was promoted to major general and participated in the Perryville campaign that autumn. After service in East Tennessee during the summer of 1863, he was transferred to Gen. Braxton Bragg’s Army of Tennessee and participated in the Chickamauga and Chattanooga campaigns. Transferred to the Trans-Mississippi Department, he was promoted to lieutenant general and served in that theater until the collapse of the Confederacy in 1865.

After a brief post-war residency in New Orleans, he returned to Kentucky in 1868 and obtained employment in the life insurance business. In 1873 he left Louisville and returned to the old family estate, Glen Lily in Hart County. He also made annual trips to Chicago regarding the property he owned there.
In 1883 Buckner lost his bid to win the Democratic nomination for Kentucky governor. Following the death of his first wife, Mary Jane Kingsbury Buckner in 1874, Buckner married Delia Claiborne of Richmond, Virginia in 1885. He subsequently served as Governor of Kentucky from 1887 to 1891. Historians later described his administration as both honest and efficient. He was the vice presidential candidate for the Gold Democratic party in the presidential election of 1896.

Buckner spent his last years at Glen Lily but he continued to make public statements on both state and national politics. He died in 1914 at the age of 91 and is buried in the State Cemetery in Frankfort, Kentucky.

Folder List

Box 1
Folder 1: Buckner Family to Simon Bolivar Buckner at West Point, June 1840-December 1840
Folder 2: Buckner Family to Simon Bolivar Buckner at West Point, 1841
Folder 3: Buckner Family to Simon Bolivar Buckner at West Point, 1842
Folder 4: Buckner Family to Simon Bolivar Buckner at West Point, 1843
Folder 5: Parents to Simon Bolivar Buckner, undated
Folder 6: Cadets, Friends, etc. to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 1840-1910
Folder 7: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Family in Arkansas, 1841, 1850-1857

Box 2
Folder 8: Simon Bolivar Buckner correspondence with Mary Kingsbury Buckner, 1846-1872
Folder 9: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Mrs. Jane Kingsbury, 1846-1849
Folder 10: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Mrs. Jane Kingsbury, 1850-1853 and unmatched envelopes
Folder 11: Simon Bolivar Buckner correspondence with Julius Jesse Bronson Kingsbury, and Simon Bolivar Buckner to Henry Kingsbury, 1848-1856
Folder 12: Simon Bolivar Buckner to T. L. Barrett, 1851-1852
Folder 13: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, 1862
Folder 14: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Letters, 1863
Folder 15: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, 13-20 June 1863
Folder 16: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, 21-28 June 1863

Box 3
Folder 17: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, Telegrams, June 1863
Folder 18: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, 1864
Folder 19: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, Trans-Mississippi Department, 1865
Folder 20: Ambrose E. Burnside to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 11 May 1861 and July 1878
Folder 21: James Longstreet to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 1865, 1866, 1872, 1902
Folder 22: Simon Bolivar Buckner Correspondence, 1866-1867
Folder 23: William Brown to Simon Bolivar Buckner and Mary Kingsbury Buckner regarding property, 1867, 1870
Folder 24: Lily Buckner to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 1878-1883

Box 4
Folder 25: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Delia Claiborne Buckner, 1882-1884
Folder 26: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Delia Claiborne Buckner, January 1885-March 1885
Folder 27: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Delia Claiborne Buckner, April 1885-June 1885
Folder 28: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Delia Claiborne Buckner, 1886, 1888-1889
Folder 29: Simon Bolivar Buckner to Delia Claiborne Buckner, 1891-1892
Folder 30: Delia Claiborne Buckner to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 1882-March 1885
Folder 31: Delia Claiborne Buckner to Simon Bolivar Buckner, April 1885-1887
Folder 32: Delia Claiborne Buckner to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 1912
Folder 33: Simon Bolivar Buckner and Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. Correspondence, 1892, 1905-1912

Box 5
Folder 34: Simon Bolivar Buckner General Correspondence, 1871-1878, undated
Folder 35: Simon Bolivar Buckner General Correspondence, 1880-1889, undated
Folder 36: Simon Bolivar Buckner General Correspondence, 1890-1899, undated
Folder 37: Simon Bolivar Buckner General Correspondence, 1900-1911
Folder 38: Former Slaves to Simon Bolivar Buckner, including Shelburne, 1892-1911
Folder 39: Correspondence to Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. and wife, 1893, 1940, undated

Box 6
Folder 40: Julius Kingsbury Estate, 1856-1891
Folder 41: Bank of Attica vs. Simon B. Buckner regarding Kingsbury Estate, 1861
Folder 42: Simon Bolivar Buckner Legal and Real Estate Papers, 1857-1908
Folder 43: Southern Hospital Association Materials, 1866
Folder 44: Simon Bolivar Buckner Cancelled Checks and Notes, 1869-1905
Folder 45: Simon Bolivar Buckner Investments, 22 January 1895
Folder 46: Simon Bolivar Buckner Mexican War Memoir (draft), undated
Folder 47: United States Army General Orders #1-16, 1858
Folder 48: Simon Bolivar Buckner Fort Donelson Report, 11 August 1862
Folder 49: Draft of Simon Bolivar Buckner Proclamation “To the Freemen of Kentucky”, 14 September 1862
Folder 50: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, Notes on Chickamauga Campaign, September 1863

Box 7
Folder 51: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, Miscellaneous Special Orders, October 1863-November 1863
Folder 52: Simon Bolivar Buckner Civil War Papers, Returns and Reports, 1863, undated
Folder 53: “An Apology for the Campaign in Kentucky and Middle Tennessee,” undated, circa 1863
Folder 54: CSA Printed Material and Union General Orders No. 6, 1862-1865
Folder 55: United Confederate Veterans Reunions, 1911-1914
Folder 56: “The Lessons of Freemasonry,” Anonymous, [Simon Bolivar Buckner?], 23 December 1867
Folder 57: Anonymous Resolution on the Death of Robert E. Lee, January 1870
Folder 58: Simon Bolivar Buckner speeches re: retirement, etc., 1880s-1900
Folder 59: Pamphlets, Printed Speeches, etc. of Simon Bolivar Buckner and Others, 1880s-1890s
Folder 60: Simon Bolivar Buckner Speeches and Published Pamphlet, 1887, 1893 and undated

Box 8
Folder 61: Simon Bolivar Buckner Speeches, circa 1888-1895
Folder 62: Simon Bolivar Buckner Senate Election, undated
Folder 63: Constitutions of Kentucky and Contract for Colonization of Texas, 1858, 1889, 1891
Folder 64: Political ephemera, circa 1880s-1890s
Folder 65: Chart Regarding Public Printing, ca. 1885?
Folder 66: Notes and Printed Material re: Tariff and Taxes, ca. 1887-1891
Folder 67: Proceedings of Constitutional Convention (Printed), 1890
Folder 68: The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine, September 1885 and April 1897
Folder 69: The Southern Bivouac, April 1887
Folder 70: Simon Bolivar Buckner in Print, 1887-1990
Folder 71: Otto Rothert to Simon Bolivar Buckner, 4 part Newspaper History of the Buckner Stack in Muhlenburg County, 1906

Box 9
Folder 72: Confederate Veteran, March 1914
Folder 73: Hal Engerud, “The Seige of Munfordville, KY”, 1931
Folder 74: Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. Biographical Notes and Correspondence on Simon Bolivar Buckner, 1928-1936
Folder 75: Simon Bolivar Buckner Biographical Notes and Reminiscences and Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. Notes on Father, undated
Folder 76: “CSA Brigadier General Simon Bolivar Buckner’s Performance at Fort Donelson,” by William C. Buckner and Jim Jean, undated
Folder 77: Anonymous [Archibald Gracie IV?]. Papers, Notes on Battle of Chickamauga, undated
Folder 78: Newspaper and Clippings, 1855-1998, undated

Box 10
Folder 79: Newspaper and Clippings, 1844-1911, undated
Folder 80: Newspaper Clippings and Miscellaneous, 1870-1917, undated
Folder 81: Scrapbook of Clippings on Buckner’s time as Governor, 1887-1894

Box 11
Folder 82: Scrapbook of Clippings on Buckner’s Death, 1914
Folder 83: Scrapbook of Clippings on Buckner’s Death, 1915
Folder 84: Stamps, Coupons, ca. 1893-1894
Folder 85: Church Taxation, ca. 1890
Folder 86: Miscellaneous Material, 1861-2008

Box 12
Folder 87: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1783-1827
Folder 88: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1828-1829
Folder 89: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1829-1832
Folder 90: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1833-1834
Folder 91: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1836-1837
Folder 92: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1838
Folder 93: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, July 1839-December 1839
Folder 94: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1840
Folder 95: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1840-1841
Folder 96: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1842
Folder 97: Aylett H. Buckner Papers, 1843-1858

Box 13
Folder 98: Buckner Family Correspondence, 1840-1858
Folder 99: Kingsbury Family Letters Received, 1825-1855, undated
Folder 100: Henry Kingsbury to Family, 1851-1857
Folder 101: Mary Kingsbury Buckner to Jane Kingsbury, 1851-1853, 1856
Folder 102: H. W. Kingsbury “Journal” to Cousin, Mrs. J. C. Kingsbury, undated
Folder 103: Henry Kingsbury School Records and Expenses, 1850-1857
Folder 104: Mary Kingsbury Buckner School Records and Expenses, 1846-1857
Folder 105: Wharfage Claims and Court Cases for Kingsbury Estate, 1862, Undated
Folder 106: Delia Claiborne Buckner Letters Received, 1878-1888
Folder 107: Delia Claiborne Buckner Letters Received and Miscellaneous, 1892-1915, 1932
Folder 108: Correspondence to Landon Claiborne, 1881
Folder 109: Miscellaneous Envelopes, undated


Don Carlos Buell was born March 23, 1818, in Ohio. When Buell was an infant, his father died, so Buell was sent to live with his uncle. Later, Buell attended the United States Military Academy. Buell fought valiantly during the Mexican-American War, and when the Civil War erupted in the 1860s, Buell was sent to train the Army of the Potomac. Buell was then transferred to command the Army of the Ohio, and he was hailed as the "Hero of Shiloh" because his men came in time to aid Grant. After the war, Buell came to live at Airdrie in Muhlenberg County.

Ephraim Brank was born in 1791, and he is the Muhlenberg County War of 1812 hero. Brank is largely credited with helping America win the Battle of New Orleans. Brank's statue, which was erected in the early 2000s, still stands today outside of the Greenville Courthouse.


One of the last Confederate generals surrenders

Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of the Confederate Trans-Mississippi division, surrenders on May 26, 1865, one of the last Confederate generals to capitulate. Smith, who had become commander of the area in January 1863, was charged with keeping the Mississippi River open to the Southerners. Yet he was more interested in recapturing Arkansas and Missouri, largely because of the influence of Arkansans in the Confederate Congress who helped to secure his appointment.

Drawing sharp criticism for his failure to provide relief for Vicksburg, Mississippi in the summer of 1863, Smith later conducted the resistance to the Union’s failed Red River campaign of 1864. When the Confederate forces under Robert E. Lee and Joseph Johnston surrendered in the spring of 1865, Smith continued to resist with his small army in Texas. He insisted that Lee and Johnston were prisoners of war and decried Confederate deserters. On May 26, General Simon Buckner, acting for Smith, met with Union officers in New Orleans to arrange the surrender of Smith’s force under terms similar to Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House, Virginia. Smith reluctantly agreed, and officially laid down his arms at Galveston on June 2. Smith himself fled to Mexico, and then to Cuba, before returning to Virginia in November 1865 to sign an amnesty oath. He was the last surviving full Confederate general until his death in 1893.

Twenty-three days after Smith’s surrender, Brigadier General Stand Watie, a Cherokee, became the last Confederate field general to surrender.


SIMON BOLIVAR BUCKNER, CSA - History

Honor your hero with thoughts, memories, images and stories.

Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr. was one of the highest ranking United States military officers to be killed during World War II. The son of a Confederate general, Buckner led the successful invasion of Okinawa in 1945 and was killed by enemy fire in the last days of the battle. Buckner held the rank of Lieutenant General by the end of his service and was posthumously promoted to the rank of Four-Star General.

Unknown,

The Official US Army Register entries for Simon B. Buckner Jr.:

Born in Kentucky July 18, 1886.

He entered the US Military Academy on June 16, 1904. He graduated 58 out of a class of 108 on February 14, 1908. In his graduating year he was a Lieutenant in the Corps of Cadets in Company A. Upon graduation he was commissioned a 2nd Lieutenant in the 9th Infantry. He was promoted to 1st Lieutenant on August 5, 1914. On September 1, 1915 he was transferred to the 27th Infantry. He received a promotion to Captain on May 15, 1917.
On August 5, 1917 Buckner was offered the temporary rank of Major in the Signal Corps which he accepted on September 27 of that year. On January 24, 1918 he was temporarily promoted to Major of Infantry and he vacated the Signal Corps assignment on May 27, 1918. He held the temporary rank of Major of Infantry until August 20, 1919.

On July 1, 1920 Buckner was promoted to the permanent rank of Major in the Regular Army. In 1924 he graduated from the Infantry School Advanced Course and in 1925 he was a Distinguished Graduate of the Command and General Staff School. In 1929 he graduated from the Army War College.

On April 1, 1932 Buckner was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. He was promoted to Colonel on January 11, 1937. From October 17, 1939 to May 28, 1940 he was a member of the General Staff Corps.

Buckner was promoted to Brigadier General on September 1, 1940 and to Major General on August 4, 1941.On May 4, 1943 he was promoted to Lieutenant General.

He was killed in action on June 18, 1945.

On July 19, 1954 Buckner was posthumously promoted to the rank of General ( Four-Star ).


Watch the video: Simón Bolívar, el falso héroe. Pablo Victoria (August 2022).